Tag: recycle

Kantha Style Quilted Footstool

Kantha Style Quilted Footstool

A little blue footstool–a vintage thrift store find–became the newest fodder for my latest stitching obsession.

 

This cotton upholstery fabric finally earned its keep in my stash, pairing beautifully with the original paint of the stool.
I love the texture the stitching gives.
Boro Style Sashiko Stitched Pillow

Boro Style Sashiko Stitched Pillow

It’s a new year, and I’m trying new things.  Boro style textiles have captured my imagination, and sashiko stitching can easily be embraced by those of us who are daunted by the skill and precision of traditional American dainty little quilting stitches.  I’ve received such a positive reaction to my first piece and have gotten many questions, so I’m just going to lay out my process here.  And remember, I have no idea what I’m doing.  I’m just doing, and this was my first piece.  I have graduated to my second, however, for whatever grandeur that might lend to my resume.

I started by gathering a selection of fabrics—new, old, antique, quilt squares, etc. that I thought might work well together. I know this sounds easy, but I spent the better part of an afternoon rearranging, editing, and changing up the whole thing.
When it was time to go make dinner, this is where things were at. Then I walked away for the night so I could look at it with fresh eyes in the morning.  Still happy then, I pinned everything down thoroughly.
This is a wee bit out of order, but I layered all my random top pieces over a foundation fabric the size I wanted my finished piece to be plus seam allowance. I happened to be using a vintage cloth napkin my husband deemed unacceptable as it resembled a torn up sheet, but you could use anything in your stash including an actual torn up sheet… Just don’t make it too thick because you will be stitching through it in addition to all your other top layers.  It’s a little different than what I did here, but I would recommend first starting with a row of running stitches around the entire perimeter of the piece.  After that, anything goes.
Then I just started stitching. Imperfect running stitches based on whim or influenced by the piece of fabric I was stitching over. Sashiko means “little stabs”, so just go at it and don’t worry about anything. I jumped all over the piece, stitching where I felt like in no particular order.
So that’s really it. I finished the first piece there and made it into an oversized pillow. This piece is now my second venture into the technique.

Happy Stitching!

Primitive Trencher

Primitive Trencher

We are renovating an old farmhouse.  There is a lot of very cool stuff ending up in the dumpster.  So, yeah.  I’m the crazy lady dumpster diving in her own dumpster to salvage cool things.  I also needed a way to display a new yarn I’m designing with AND I was home alone with the workshop all to myself.  So I made a Primitive Trencher.  This is the first of several that ended up happening…

Doesn’t it look like I know what I’m doing??
Clamp-ons.

Wax on.
Complete. The perfect yarn trencher for Loch Lomond, a beautiful and very earth-friendly yarn by BC Garn. Both the Trencher and the Yarn are available at The Barn at Todd Farm in Rowley, Ma.

Now and Then

I love it when my work is transformative.  If only it were so easy when the project is Me.

The challenge was to create something new, that looks very old.
The legs were hand sanded, leaving a patina of stain, then lightly waxed. I used a remnant of an antique oriental rug to upholster the stool.
Transformed.

The stool as it came to me. 1960's maybe?

The Good Ole Days

Vintage Finds to Inspire

Not so very long ago, recycling was a way of life, not a trend.  A surprising, if not charming, reminder of this wended itself my way at an antique shop in Brunswick, ME.  A feed sack, of all things, was purposed for fiber art!  Utterly functional in getting supplies to the farm, this beautiful coral cotton sack was printed with inks that are easily removed expressly for the purpose of allowing the cloth to become a dress, a curtain, a pair of knickers.  It is a fabulous concept that I had never come across before.  I’m completely enamored.  As my husband and I continued our flea market hopping, as we are known to do, this fabulous thing that I had never been aware of before kept presenting itself.  And I lost all control.  I purchased every feed, salt, and growing ration sack from Woolwich to Bath.  And now, to the studio.  Must.  Sew.

So many options. My head is spinning with design ideas.

Remnants

As a fiber lover, stash management is always an issue.  Everything seems to have such intrinsic value.  And that has only been getting worse for me as I’ve been exploring rug hooking and quilting.  Every little tiny scrap is suddenly a representative of enormous value.  I don’t want to throw anything away.  This is especially true when I am working with vintage textiles, rugs, and linens.  I love discovering the new life that lies hidden in an old tea towel or tattered rug, repurposing its charm into pillows, purses, and brooches.  But what to do with the remains?  Those leftover little pieces of antiquity that lie on the cutting table?  This has become my personal challenge:  find the latent purpose of these remnants of our forebears.  They certainly wouldn’t have wasted a scrap, so why should I?

Small remnants of an antique rug find new life.
These are the perfect accent for so many styles of decor.

And it progresses

I’m still searching for a few more pieces of fabric to complement the background colors. Unfortunately, whenever I find the perfect piece of wool to work with, inevitably it is being worn as part of some lucky person’s ensemble (pants, skirts, etc.). A little inappropriate to get all grabby about it.